Proxy, * A person, appointed in the place of another, to represent him.

2. In the ecclesiastical law, a judicial proctor, or one who is appointed to manage another man's law concerns, is called a proxy. Ayl. Parerg.

3. The instrument by which a person is appointed so to act, is likewise called a proxy.

4. Proxies are also annual payments made by the parochial clergy to the bishop, &c., on visitations. Tom. Law Dictionary, h. t. Vide Rutherf. Inst. 253; Hall's Pr. 14.

5. The right of voting at an election of an incorporated company by proxy is not a general right, and the party claiming it must show a special authority for that purpose. Ang. on Corp. 67-69; 1 Paige's Ch. Rep. 590; 5 Day's Rep. 329; 5 Cowen, Rep. 426.

* From Bouvier's Law Dictionary, 1856 Edition. Please see Bouvier's Legal Abbreviations & Abbreviated References for help with obscure nomenclature & references.

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